Archive for the ‘ Renaissance ’ Category

Where is the David?

How many Davids can we find around the globe?
Have you seen the David somewhere? In a store? In a square?
If you see the David, take a picture and share it.

Where is the David?

This is an initiative launched by the Florence City Council, a contest which plans to find copies or fanciful interpretations of Michelangelo’s David in the World, Internet users are invited to photograph or film the most imaginative reworkings of the statue.
Your picture will be available online for other users and it can be part of an exhibition at Le Murate in Florence!

Michelangelo's David

David is a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture created between 1501 and 1504, by the Italian artist Michelangelo. It is a 5.17 metre (17 foot) marble statue of a standing male nude. The statue represents the Biblical hero David and was instead placed in Piazza della Signoria.
The statue was moved to the Accademia Gallery in Florence in 1873, and later replaced at the original location by a replica.

Don’t forget, Find your David, Take a Picture and Share It!
See you

3D Reconstruction of Veduta della Catena, Florence

Here is the 3D reconstruction of the the famous Veduta della Catena (Chain Map). The video is going to be shown and explained by the Director of the Palazzo Vecchio Family Museum Paola Pacetti next sunday 20th February in Florence, during the eighth national meeting of Archaeologia viva.

This painting is in the historical-topographical Museum Firenze com’era.

Nineteenth Copy of the Veduta della Catena

The original print, the first known perspective map of Florence realized in 1470 and attribute to Francesco di Lorenzo Rosselli, is displayed at the Bode Museum in Berlin.

Original Chain Map (1470)

At the end of the XVth century, Florence counts 40.000 citizens.
The medieval walls surrounding the city leave out big green areas just outside a densely populated urban centre. Among the buildings, the symbols of civic and religious power stand out: Palazzo della Signoria, Palazzo del Podestà and the Cathedral, just completed with the Brunelleschi’s grandiose Dome. Close to the city walls, the houses are set all around the churches of the preaching orders of Santa Maria Novella, Santa Maria del Carmine, Santo Spirito. The Arno river, with its four medieval bridges, is lively with the intense activity animating its waters and banks. Notice how the main buildings, churches, bridges, city doors show inscriptions with their names.

Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne, Rome

Last weekend I was in Rome as a tourist for a quick and enjoyable holiday.
When I was walking from Campo de’ Fiori (where I just had a great sandwich) to Pantheon, I suddenly found it on my left and I immediately was reminded of its peculiarities that no one knows.

Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne

The Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne is a Renaissance palace designed by Baldassarre Peruzzi in 1532-1536 on a site of three contiguous palaces owned by the old Roman Massimo family and built after arson destroyed the earlier structures during the Sack of Rome (1527).
The entrance is characterized by a central portico with six Doric columns, paired and single. Inside there are two courtyards, of which the first one has a portico with Doric columns as a basement for a rich loggia, which is also made of Doric columns. The recessed entrance portico differs from typical palazzo models such as exemplified by the Florentine Palazzo Medici.

Few people know the building is developed in only 2 / 3 of the façade, the designer included a small portion of the adjacent building on the left to create symmetry on entry as well as all of us now see.

Palazzo Massimo alle Colonne, Plan

Clet Abraham – How a contemporary artist exhibits his work at Palazzo Vecchio, Florence

In the Palazzo Vecchio’s gallery in Florence there isn’t now the portrait of Battiferri Laura, the sculptor Bartolomeo Ammannati‘s wife, painted by Agnolo di Cosimo usually known as “Il Bronzino” between 1555 and 1560, because it’s staying in Palazzo Strozzi at the exhibition “Bronzino. Artist and Poet at the Court of the Medici” until january 2011.

 

Portrait of Laura Battiferri, c. 1560; Oil on canvas; Palazzo Vecchio, Florence.

 

Thursday, October 7, a contemporary artist , Clet Abraham, 44 years old, went to the Palazzo Vecchio‘s Gallery with a briefcase and stealthily placed his own self-portrait where the Battiferri’s portrait were. Friday night the portrait has been removed when someone noticed the painting must not to be there.

 

Abraham's self-portrait in Palazzo Vecchio

 

The author’s words: “There I took it myself, it was a joke, a way to attract attention to artists who live and work in Florence”.

The City Council’s words: “We’re doing an investigation, if it’s a joke with the complicity of a guardian, no problem. If he’s really managed to get into undisturbed, there is a seriuos security problem.

Botticelli’s Primavera how you have never seen it

Botticelli's Primavera

Primavera, also known as ‘Allegory of Spring’, is a tempera panel painting by Italian Renaissance artist Sandro Botticelli.
The painting, depicting a group of mythological figures in an garden, is allegorical for the lush growth of Spring and it has since 1919 been part of the collection of the Uffizi Gallery in Florence, Italy.

Exclusively on Repubblica.it until October 6, 2011 thanks technology Haltadefinizione – you can enjoy every little detail of the framework.

Click here, you can see this painting how you have never seen it.

You can zoom in or zoom out with the scroller wheel

see more on wikipedia